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02 Dec 15

How To Dance The Tech Cha-Cha From Your First Website To Profitability

Guest post from You Inspire Me’s Tech Ninja, Daniel James Paterson.

Woman on computer - aiming for website tech profitability?Here’s to the internet! The solution to – and cause of – all of life’s problems.

No doubt Homer Simpson would approve of his illuminating quip being updated for the digital age – online tech is both the beautiful emancipation and evil nemesis of many a self-employed warrior.

I’m Daniel, resident Tech Ninja, and today I’m distilling how we navigated the rock-and-roll tech years from first website to solid profitability.

Six years ago, I embarked on a life-changing journey with Corrina to bring her love of authentic heart-centred marketing for the self-employed to a wider audience. A journey from her first website to a scale-up of contribution and profits.

The pesky plugins, the moments of beautiful perfection, the disheartening website downtime, the satisfaction of realising what needed oiling and when, the money wasted. We joyfully did it all.

Here are our key tech principles for navigating from your first website to profitability:

1. Keep Ear Plugs Handy

Oh my word, it’s noisy on that internet. The amount of options to do essentially the same thing is cavernous.

There are dozens of payment methods, plugins, webinar providers, WordPress themes. You can lose months trying to choose.

Ask your peers what they use, understand your top few needs, sleep on it for a night or two and just get going with the tool that resonates.

2. We Like Flow Yoga

Your website will be stretched, twisted and bent as you adapt it to new products, set up new list-builders and evolve the way you present testimonials.

Use the flexibility and adaptability of WordPress and its plugins. It’s a robust platform and doesn’t care if the soles of feet are flat to the ground during your downward dog.

3. You Have Marketing Values. And Therefore Tech Values

Understand your tech values and they will support your marketing values.

At You Inspire Me, we treasure robustness over bling-bling functionality. We want people to get what they paid for – so we value putting time into preventing live courses going down as much as creating a polished website feel. We invested time and money in both.

4. Spend Your Time On Your Tribe

Daniel helping a client towards tech profitabilityFocus on marketing your gift, helping your people – and outsource the majority of the tech. Why struggle to do it half-well on your own whilst completely distracting yourself from crafting your best copy or designing the perfect list-builders for your ideal client?

Keep yourself in your zone of genius, joyfully imparting your guardian angel gifts to your community. And empower someone else to do the techy tech.

5. Learned Helpfulness

That said, you are most certainly able to put a code snippet into the WordPress HTML editor yourself. And you will enjoy overcoming the resistance to doing it.

I admire Corrina for now being as capable in adding an alt tag as she is in writing a blog post. (I salute you, dear friend.)

Sit down and do it, and then you will know how to do it. And your tech ninja partner will be free to solve your most complex problems.

6. Bells and whistles. Thank you, but no

Your website only needs what your business model needs, no more.

We’ve had thousands of paying clients – but we’ve never had a payment shopping cart. An online cart allows a customer to select several purchases and then pay for them all at once. We sell one-offs and using several PayPal Buy Now buttons simplifies our tech whilst strengthening our on-page call-to-action – two of our marketing-come-tech values.

7. The cloud isn’t whiter on the other side

The Smiths sang that “every appliance is like a new science in this tooooown”. And in doing so they recognised that you should often stick with the tech you know.

All technology has a learning curve and the time taken to change to something else will be high. Unless absolutely necessary, be at peace with a bit of imperfection in your current system instead of changing to the latest cool tool.

8. You are taller than tech pebbles. Step over them

Online tech is open-source – AKA built-in-a-bedroom – and sometimes it simply doesn’t work as it’s meant to. It’s not your fault, and it doesn’t all need to be fixed.

I have a degree in Engineering… and yet there’s some weirdo-weird happenings on our weird websites that I can’t fix.

That’s OK. We sort the important ones and tell our course participants to watch out for the others.

NEED SUPPORT WITH THE TECH DANCE?

Drop me a line at danieljpaterson@yahoo.co.uk if you’re still feeling a bit like the great philosopher Homer Simpson.

Whilst still a loyal father to You Inspire Me’s tech needs – creating custom page templates, ironing out email glitches and swashbuckling plugins – I’m also available to hold other self-employed hands as you focus on your marketing and successfully dance from your first website to profitability.

OVER TO YOU

What tech dance moves have you learned since the joy of getting your first website set up? How did you overcome the sinking feeling when you realised an About page was just the beginning of your tech journey?

Or are you still swimming in the sea of tech overwhelm and confusion and not even sure where to start with it all?

Leave us a comment below; we’d so love to hear from you.

P.S. PASS IT ON

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© Corrina Gordon-Barnes

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8 Comments

  1. Rosemarie

    Love it Daniel – what a great article. As an official ‘techie’ who is having one of those weeks where *nothing* works first time (and you are lucky if it works third time… – how many hoops do you have to jump to post a job on Linkedin for goodness sake…) I think your sense of balance here is perfect. There are amazing tools out there – learn to use them, bend them to your will, don’t get overwhelmed by them, and when the going gets tough go away an eat chocolate for a bit!
    Rosemarie´s last blog post ..New email life-saver

    1. Daniel (You Inspire Me)

      Thanks Rosemarie. You’re so right – balance is key with tech, just like in all areas of a self-employed business.

      Good luck with your issues – everything is figureoutable!

  2. Jo Dyer

    Hi Daniel

    I have a weebly website that I created myself. I am trying to make it more business-like instead of the ‘brochure’ that it started out as.
    when I created it, I didn’t need it to ‘sell’. Now I do. Do you work with weebly? Can you show me how to put a paypal button onto my sales pages (they aren’t all written yet). Also, can you help with the SEO issues? Ta very much. Jo

  3. Kate Bacon

    Great post Daniel…refreshing to have writing in “tech” in plain English.

    Best advice ever: “sometimes it simply doesn’t work as it’s mean’t too…and it doesn’t all need to be fixed”!

    May I keep your details to pass on to potential clients, as I don’t offer ad-hoc tech support, unless clients have already created their WordPress sites with me?

    Thanks

    Kate
    Kate Bacon´s last blog post ..Website security – how to keep your WordPress site safe

    1. Daniel (You Inspire Me)

      Glad that it resonated with you Kate!

      That would be super if you could pass on my details to any one who may need assistance – thank you. I’ll email you.

  4. Karen J

    Thanks for the Permission to ‘let your (my) tech be good enough’! I needed to hear that today 🙂

    1. Daniel (You Inspire Me)

      I hear from a lot of people that they are not putting their services up for sale because they are ashamed of their website.

      Most likely they are seeing flaws that others won’t 🙂

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